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Join us for the 20th Anniversary of Empty Bowls!

Empty Bowls 2017This year marks the 20th Anniversary of Empty Bowls on February 2, 2017. This major fundraiser for the Food Bank for Larimer County began at Lopez Elementary when an art teacher, Mike McCarthy, inspired his students to create empty bowls to represent those who do not have enough to eat. Forty community members gathered at Lopez and an annual event to raise funds and awareness for hunger-relief in Fort Collins was born. In 1997, the inaugural year of Empty Bowls, the Food Bank for Larimer County distributed two million pounds of food to those in need. As Empty Bowls has grown, so too has the need in our community.

By purchasing tickets to the Empty Bowls event, guests will receive a hand-crafted pottery bowl created by a Poudre School District student or local artist. Fort Collins’ restaurants will provide soup for dinner and ice cream and coffee for dessert.  A silent art auction will also take place during the event.

As a major fundraiser for the Food Bank, Empty Bowls raises awareness by reminding us that thousands of our neighbors face empty bowls on their tables throughout the year. For the price of one ticket to Empty Bowls, guests will help the Food Bank provide over $250 worth of food to serve hope to families in need in our community.

Empty Bowls has grown from offering five signature soups in 1998 to over twenty soups in 2016 and has raised more than $775,000 over the years for the Food Bank’s hunger-relief programs.

Special 20th Anniversary Events Include:

  • VIP Artists’ Reception at 4:30 pm – more details to come!
  • Live Auction Clay Throwing
  • Special Anniversary Program
  • Recognition Ceremony

Seating is limited at the Empty Bowls event, purchase your tickets here as they frequently sell out.

Details:

Date: Thursday, February 2, 2017
Time: 5:30 – 8:30 pm
Location: Hilton Fort Collins
Tickets: $55/individual; $100/pair
Purchase your tickets.

Food Bank Provides Bridge to Future

Food Bank for Larimer County ClientAlexandra is a graduate student at Colorado State University and recently began using the Food Bank for Larimer County to help support herself and her husband. She is a former Peace Corps volunteer and has a degree in international relations; she also works part-time while writing her thesis and taking classes. Alexandra’s husband is at school 13 hours a day as a full-time student at the University of Northern Colorado. As a result of their busy school schedules and the fact they can only work part-time, Alexandra and her husband do not have any extra money at the end of the month.

With the money Alexandra’s family saves by utilizing the Food Bank, she and her husband now have a small savings account that enables them to pay larger bills such as car insurance and tuition.

She notes, “being a graduate student of nutrition, I can really appreciate all the healthy, whole foods the Food Bank provides, and I’m able to make nutritious meals throughout the week because of it.”

Once she finishes school and has a full-time job, Alexandra plans to give regularly to the Food Bank as a way to show appreciation for providing help in their time in need and to also pass on this wonderful resource to others.

Holiday Tribute Cards Provide Meaningful Gift

tribute-cardMake a donation in honor of family, friends or coworkers this holiday season and we’ll provide a colorful tribute card to let them know you care about fighting hunger. Each $15 card will provide $75 worth of  food to families in need. We will gladly accept your mailing list and mail these cards on your behalf  or can send the cards to you for you to share.

Help us give the gift of food to hungry neighbors this holiday season.

The Old Table

The Old Table

Chuck-Gill-cropped

 

By Chuck Gill, Chief Operations Officer

 

When I first started working at the Food Bank 19 years ago, we only had one table in the warehouse
for volunteers to bag USDA commodity products to distribute to our guests. It was made of solid-wood and had a sheet of vinyl flooring on the top. Its design made it easy for volunteers to bag food and to clean up.

Somewhere along the line, a volunteer named Ernie Cummins noticed that the vinyl was looking pretty ragged. He asked me if he could refinish the table. Of course I agreed, even though I thought that the table might only make it for a few more years. Despite that, Ernie wanted to save it.

Recently, Ernie and Peter Lederer, another Monday morning volunteer, asked if they could refinish it a second time. Here is the result. After more than 19 years, it still does its job, very well I might add.

Many interesting conversations, lively debates and friendships have formed around that table. If it could only tell some stories it would have a few tales to tell. Thanks to Ernie and Peter it lives on.