Posts

Food Bank Support Eases Tough Choices for Seniors in Our Community

Food Bank for Larimer County Aids Seniors in NeedLupe Gonzalez, a 71-year-old senior and Fort Collins resident, moved here in 1985 with her three children from Wyoming. She was a single mother working three jobs to make ends meet, including translating for Spanish-speaking patients at the hospital. Lupe worked hard and was proud to give her children a better childhood than she had.

Lupe worked her way up and earned medical terminology degree from LCCC and perfected her spoken and written Spanish skills to continue translating. She taught at an education center and helped others learn medical terminology and translation skills. During those years, Lupe was proud to be self-sufficient. “I was doing good with a good car and everything.”

In 2001, she suffered a stroke, ending her earning years. It took Lupe months to recover, eventually regaining the ability to speak. However, the stroke wiped out areas of her memory, including medical terminology and her translating abilities. It took Lupe three years to qualify for disability, but only three months to run through her savings.

Food Bank for Larimer county helps feed seniors in needIn 2004, a friend of Lupe’s suggested she attend the VOA senior meal program and she’s been a regular ever since. Lupe described it by saying, “I got a lot of friends here. I get to go places because they take us here and there. The food, the meals are good, too.”

Lupe makes ends meet with meals at the senior lunch program and with the help of the Food Bank for Larimer County. Twice a week she helps prepare and serve senior meals at the Northside Aztlan Center in Fort Collins, Colorado. In trade for volunteering, Lupe’s meals are free and there are often leftovers to bring home. She enjoys the social aspect of the meal time, including the competitive bingo games.

Lupe also frequents the Food Bank.  “The Food Bank really helps me,” Lupe says.  She relies on the Food Bank as much as twice a week as long as she’s not snowed in and has transportation.

With the help of the Food Bank for Larimer County and the senior meal program, Lupe worries less about putting food on the table. She does not have to make tough choices between food and paying her other expenses including housing, medicine, and transportation.

Leave a Lasting Legacy of Hope!

Most people contribute to nonprofit groups during their lifetime, but only a small number choose to continue this support through a charitable gift in their will or estate plan. You can be one of those special people. You can help the Food Bank for Larimer County continue to make a life-saving difference in our community with planned giving.

There is no better way to honor the people and moments that have made such an impact on your life than by giving to others. Planned charitable giving is not just for the wealthy; it is something we can all do to ensure a lasting legacy of hope.

There are many ways you can give back to your community and help others less fortunate. Ways to plan for charitable giving include:

  • Estate Plan – Through your estate plan, you can make provisions for those close to you, as well as help individuals who face hunger in our community. Both you and your family can benefit from your generosity to the Food Bank for Larimer County through proven, tax-wise strategies approved by the Internal Revenue Service. We suggest you consult your attorney or family estate planner for help in choosing the options best for you and your family.
  • Unrestricted Bequest – When you make an unrestricted bequest to the Food Bank for Larimer County, your gift will be used to provide food and hope where the need is greatest.
  • Restricted Bequest – Some people prefer their gift address specific emergency needs of families, to support child feeding programs, to help seniors or to be used as an endowment. We are happy to work with you and your attorney or estate planner to draft language that ensures your wishes.
  • Gifts That Pay Income – Some of the best ways to support a nonprofit and receive income are available through life-income gifts. There are three types of Charitable Remainder Trusts that allow donors to place resources into a tax-favored trust that pays income to the living individuals and donates the remainder to charity.

Planned giving makes a huge impact on the Food Bank for Larimer County. By providing a charitable gift in your estate plan, will, or trust, you ensure that essential programs and indispensable work for families and seniors will continue for years to come.

It’s never too early to start planning; please consider a legacy gift to help feed the hungry when you are writing or updating your will or trust. A few minutes of thoughtful time now will provide the framework for a lasting legacy of nourishing and enriching lives.

If you would like more information regarding planned giving or have any questions, please contact us today – we’d be happy to help!

Food Bank Client Knits Hats as a Way to Give Back

Food Bank for Larimer County Partnership with VOAEighty year old Bobbie is a retired nurse. She spent 30 years of her career in long-term senior care. Four years ago, after the death of her mother, who was an avid knitter, Bobbie inherited “drawers and bags” of yarn. She wasn’t sure what to do with it all and that’s when her friend Vicki suggested she start making hats to honor her mother’s memory. Bobbie loved the idea and together that year they knitted 200 hats and donated them to Coats for Colorado.

Around that same time, Bobbie started using the Food Bank. Due to a series of circumstances, Bobbie had lost her home and moved to a small apartment.  She was finding it harder and harder to make ends meet on her Social Security income. Vicki suggested she use the Food Bank.

“I remember the first time I visited, everyone was so friendly and welcoming,” said Bobbie. “I felt at home the minute I walked in.”

That’s when Bobbie decided to start donating hats to the Food Bank. Together with her friend Vicki, they knitted hats and dropped them off during their weekly visits. They made hats in a variety of colors and sizes. She was especially happy when she had blue and orange yarn to be able to make Broncos hats!  In 2015, Vicki died suddenly after a short illness. Bobbie says that she now makes her hats in honor of both her mother and her dear friend. She estimates that she’s donated over 1,000 hats over the last few years. Although she ran out of her mother’s yarn years ago, word has spread and Bobbie receives donated yarn from a variety of sources. She also stops by resale shops to find deals. Bobbie has never considered selling her hats.

“My life isn’t easy, but I have a roof over my head, food and family,” said Bobbie. “I know there are people at the Food Bank who have it worse than me. Knowing that my hats keep people warm makes me happy.”

Dohn Construction Raises $15,000 for Food Bank for Larimer County

On Friday, August 19, 2016, Dohn Construction hosted its 6th Annual Charity Golf Tournament, raising $15,250 for the Food Bank for Larimer County’s children’s programs. The tournament was held at Pelican Lakes Golf Course and Country Club in Windsor, CO and boasted 144 participants representing 34 Northern Colorado construction and architecture companies.

Dohn Construction President Doug Dohn explains, “Food scarcity is a growing issue for Larimer County’s youth, leading to poor health and performance in school. I’m happy this donation will help the Food Bank in offering kids nutritious meals. The golf tournament is one of the highlights of my year because I love seeing industry leaders come together for a great cause.”Dohn Construction’s annual golf tournament raises funds for a different area charity each year.

A late-afternoon thunderstorm ended the 2016 tournament early, leaving no winner to take home the top prize. However, the event continued to raise funds through a silent auction and games throughout the course. Silent auction items and raffle prizes were donated by 33 area businesses.

Feeding Your Child’s Brain

The beginning of another school year is just around the corner.  Now is the time to start planning how to prepare nutritious meals and snacks for your kids.  The brain requires a tremendous amount of energy to function.  Children learn best when their brains and bodies are in a nourished state. 

Read on to find tasty “brain foods” for children and the nutrients they contain.

Read more

Need Rises in Larimer County

July 2016 was a record-breaking month for Food Bank for Larimer County. From April to June we supported 50,000 household visits, breaking a previous record set in 2012 at the end of the great recession. The number of times guests visit Food Share has also increased from 2.95 visits a month in 2010, to 3.81 visits a month in April-June 2016.

The increased need also has required increased efforts to source and redistribute more food. In 2012, we distributed around 1.5 million pounds of food in April-June. In 2016, we distributed 2.04 million pounds in the last quarter. The continued growth in service means we are reaching warehouse storage capacity and putting a greater-than-ever strain on existing resources.

The future is always uncertain, but based on State Demographers projections, we expect to see continued growth in the need for our services. By 2035, the population of Larimer County is projected to reach 450,000, while the number of individuals eligible for Food Bank programs could climb to nearly 120,000. To prepare, we are working on several new initiatives that will be announced in the coming months, including a new partnership with Volunteers of America to increase meal service and potentially fresh food access for seniors. Please keep in touch on social media and through this newsletter for the latest information.

Our vision is a hunger-free Larimer County and we hope that as the population increases we can keep up with the demand and help all people in need through innovative solutions. We hope you will join us as we continue our work to ensure no one in our community goes hungry.

photo of food

Food Waste and the Food Bank Battle

We all do it. The day the milk goes “bad” according to a “best by” label it goes down the drain and the plastic container goes in the recycle bin. It’s understandable; we have been raised to believe that label on our green beans and spinach, our canned corn and pumpkin. Yet the reality is that none of those labels are regulated or even accurately indicate if a food is safe to consume.

Most foods are still good well past the “expiration date”, even fresh foods. As Ben Mensch, the volunteer coordinator at the Food Bank for Larimer County, puts it “Milk is not going to be fresh at 11:59pm and rotten at 12:01am, it just doesn’t work that way.” The problem with the dates and labeling is that none of it is regulated by the FDA or any other government agency (except for baby formula) for the consumer to actually know what is good or bad for them to consume. These numbers don’t even relate to food freshness, but instead are meant to work as a cataloging system for retailers to know when items were stocked. In May, a bill introduced in Congress has asked for federal regulation of food labeling in an attempt to cut down on food waste and inhibit states from passing bills that limit donations to food banks.

Read more

Corporate Food Fighters Raise Record-Breaking $160,000+ to Fight Hunger in Larimer County

The Corporate Food Fight, an fundraiser for the Food Bank for Larimer County, was a great success in 2016. Thirty businesses in Larimer County participated in the event raising a total of $161,116 and 5,678 pounds of food to fight hunger in Larimer County!

FoodFightLogo v 6

Read more

donna image and quote

May is Older Americans Month

May is Older Americans Month in the Feeding America community, which means it is a time to reflect and understand the needs of Older Americans in the United States that have food insecurity. In Colorado this issue is just as important as it is in the rest of the country and one that the Food […]

great_plates_hero-food-bank-larimer-fort-collins

Great Plates of Downtown 2016

NEWS RELEASE

The Downtown Fort Collins Business Association and member businesses present a vibrant dining tradition for our community this March. Dining enthusiasts will be encouraged to celebrate the authenticity, quality and diversity found only in Downtown Fort Collins, at Great Plates of Downtown 2016.  During Great Plates, thirty-seven (37) downtown restaurants will offer dinner specials at a price of $25.00 or $2.50 breakfast deals.  Attendees will be able to enjoy downtown’s during this culinary celebration while supporting the Food Bank for Larimer County.

The Downtown Fort Collins Business Association is partnering with the Food Bank for Larimer County this year to help feed people in our county.  Patrons can make contributions to support the Food Bank for Larimer County.  Every donation helps- a $1 donation is equivalent to $5 worth of food. Donations, tax and tip are not included in the Great Plates price.  For more information on the Food Bank for Larimer County or to donate online visit www.foodbanklarimer.org

Dates:              March 1 – 14, 2016

Price:              $25.00 Dinner Specials, not including tax, tip, or donation

                        $2.50 Breakfast & Dessert Specials, not including tax, tip, or donation

 

Hours: 5:00 pm to close at participating dinner restaurants

                        5:00 pm to close at participating dessert restaurants

                        Open to 10am at participating breakfast restaurants

 

Menu:  Visit DowntownFortCollins.com for Great Plates dinner, breakfast and dessert menus

 

Sponsors:

Annual Downtown Sponsors: First National Bank, Eye Center of Northern Colorado, Poudre Valley Hospital University of Colorado Health, The Group, Inc., Schrader Oil, Meritage Homes and Colorado State University.

Official Sponsors: Food Services of America, Odell Brewery, 90 Shilling, High Country Beverage and Coors Light.

Media Partners: The Fort Collins Coloradoan and Town Square Media

Contributing Sponsors: Citizen Printing and ValPak of N. Colorado

Media Contact:          

Erica Vander Sande (Marketing Manager), Downtown Fort Collins Business Association, (970) 484-6500

Events

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria