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Kids Cafe Summer Schedule

Food TruckMore than one in three students in Larimer County schools qualifies for free or reduced lunch. For these children, summer vacation means no school meals and the prospect of going hungry. Food Bank for Larimer County is committed to ending childhood hunger through a variety of programs, including Kids Cafe.

This summer, the Food Bank will serve healthy, made from scratch meals for children ages 5-18 at thirteen sites throughout Larimer County. Through the Kids Cafe program, the Food Bank expects to serve 55,000 meals and 20,000 snacks this summer. On average, the program will provide a record-setting 1,400 meals per day.

“Even if hunger is temporary, its impact can last a lifetime,” said Liz Donovan, Nutrition and Programs Manager, Food Bank for Larimer County. “Children who miss breakfast and lunch arFood Trucke more susceptible to health and wellness issues. Hunger can also impact academic success and behavior. Through our Kids Cafe program, we’re working hard to give more kids the nourishment they need to thrive.”

Thanks to a generous $50,000 grant from Northern Colorado Unify, the Food Bank for will be expanding its Kids Cafe’s capabilities to include Food Truck service at three CARE Housing communities in Fort Collins. Community Kitchen Manager, Justin Kruger, worked with a local company to retrofit a used truck to meet the Food Bank’s specific needs. “I’m really excited about the options the new truck provides us,” said Kruger. “We know that there are thousands of kids who receive free lunch during the school year who don’t have a consistent source for meals during the summer,” said Kruger. “Our new food truck will go a long way towards helping us feed more kids in the summer.”

The Kids Cafe  will be at the following locations this summer:

SITE LOCATION DATES TIMES ELIGIBILITY
CARE Housing*

1303 W. Swallow Rd.

Monday – Friday

June 12 – August 4

11-11:30am (Lunch) Open to All
CARE Housing*

626 Quaking Aspen Dr.

Monday – Friday

June 12 – August 4

12:30-1pm (Lunch) Open to All
CARE Housing*

400 Butch Cassidy Dr.

Monday – Friday

June 12 – August 4

11:45am-12:15pm (Lunch) Open to All
Linton Elementary

4100 Caribou Dr.

Monday – Thursday

June 5 – August 4

9-9:30am (Breakfast)

11:30am-12:30pm (Lunch)

Enrolled

Students Only

Lincoln Middle School

1600 Lancer Dr.

Monday – Thursday

June 5 – August 4

9-9:30am (Breakfast)

11:30am-12:30pm (Lunch)

Enrolled

Students Only

Boys & Girls Clubs – Fort Collins

1608 Lancer Dr.

Monday – Friday

June 5 – August 11

8:30-9am (Breakfast)

11:30am – 12:15pm (Lunch)

Members Only
Boys & Girls Clubs – Wellington

3815 W. Harrison Ave.

Monday – Friday

June 5 – August 11

12-1pm (Lunch)

2-3pm (Snack)

Members Only
Boys & Girls Clubs – Loveland

2500 E. 1st St.

Monday – Friday

June 5 – August 11

12-12:30pm (Lunch)

2:30-3pm (Snack)

Members Only
Boys & Girls Clubs – Estes Park

1505 Brodie Ave.

Monday – Friday

June 5 – August 4

11:30-12:30pm (Lunch)

3-4pm (Snack)

Members Only
The Matthews House

400 S. Link Ln.

Tuesday – Thursday

June 6 – August 3

12-1pm (Lunch) Open Enrollment
Base Camp

2130 W. Horsetooth Rd.

Monday – Friday

June 1 – August 11

11am-12:30pm (Lunch)

3-4pm (Snack)

Enrolled

Students Only

Lago Vista

420 E. 57th St.

Tuesday – Thursday

May 30 – July 27

9-10:15am (Snack)

11:30am-12pm(Lunch)

Residents Only
Maple Terrace

574 E. 23rd St.

Tuesday, Thursday

June 5 – July 28

12-1pm (Lunch) Residents Only

Click here to learn more about our childhood hunger initiatives and consider supporting our summer meal program and the Food Truck by donating to the Food Bank for Larimer County.

Food Bank Client Knits Hats as a Way to Give Back

Food Bank for Larimer County Partnership with VOAEighty year old Bobbie is a retired nurse. She spent 30 years of her career in long-term senior care. Four years ago, after the death of her mother, who was an avid knitter, Bobbie inherited “drawers and bags” of yarn. She wasn’t sure what to do with it all and that’s when her friend Vicki suggested she start making hats to honor her mother’s memory. Bobbie loved the idea and together that year they knitted 200 hats and donated them to Coats for Colorado.

Around that same time, Bobbie started using the Food Bank. Due to a series of circumstances, Bobbie had lost her home and moved to a small apartment.  She was finding it harder and harder to make ends meet on her Social Security income. Vicki suggested she use the Food Bank.

“I remember the first time I visited, everyone was so friendly and welcoming,” said Bobbie. “I felt at home the minute I walked in.”

That’s when Bobbie decided to start donating hats to the Food Bank. Together with her friend Vicki, they knitted hats and dropped them off during their weekly visits. They made hats in a variety of colors and sizes. She was especially happy when she had blue and orange yarn to be able to make Broncos hats!  In 2015, Vicki died suddenly after a short illness. Bobbie says that she now makes her hats in honor of both her mother and her dear friend. She estimates that she’s donated over 1,000 hats over the last few years. Although she ran out of her mother’s yarn years ago, word has spread and Bobbie receives donated yarn from a variety of sources. She also stops by resale shops to find deals. Bobbie has never considered selling her hats.

“My life isn’t easy, but I have a roof over my head, food and family,” said Bobbie. “I know there are people at the Food Bank who have it worse than me. Knowing that my hats keep people warm makes me happy.”

Food Bank Use Comes Full Circle

cowgirl4-1When Sandy Beardsley, mother of three children, found herself divorced, living in Indiana, away from her family, with no financial support, she had to think fast about how she would be able to feed herself and her kids. Working off the advice of a friend who said, “you’re a good cook, why don’t you try catering,” that’s exactly what she did.

Sandy got a cooler and began making simple bologna sandwiches with side dishes to sell to mill workers at the steel mills outside Chicago. During this time, Sandy frequented the Food Bank in Indiana to help makes ends meet for her family.

With the little money she made from her lunch route and the cost savings the Food Bank provided, Sandy eventually scraped together enough money to move back to Colorado to be near her family. She lived with her mother for the first year and began utilizing the Food Bank for Larimer County’s services. She worked hard and saved where she could in order to pull her family out of the need for the Food Bank.

cowgirl3Cowgirl Catering, working all over Northern Colorado. The company has two catering vans and is in the process of building a commercial kitchen. Sandy has cooked for many well-known bands at the Greeley Stampede and many big events in our community including CSU Equine Events, weddings, and parties. Cowgirl Catering is a well-known catering business in this region of Colorado.

If fact, Cowgirl Catering recently catered a volunteer recognition event for the Food Bank for Larimer County. She made a Seven Layer Bean Dip, Turkey Roll Ups, and many other great dishes for the event and guests were very impressed with the food offerings.

When asked about the Food Bank, Sandy commented, “The Food Bank helped keep the cost of raising my family down, so I could eek my way along. It took me a long time to save enough to move and get back on my feet.”

cowgirl2“I couldn’t have done it without the Food Bank. I fed my family everyday for 5 years, 3 years in Indiana and 2 more in Colorado.” Without the Food Bank, “I couldn’t have even made any money. Using their services allowed me to build my business because I didn’t have to worry about food as much.”

Sandy went on to say, she, in-part, credits the success of Cowgirl Catering to the Food Bank. “I have a successful business because it gave me that leg up.”

By reducing her family’s food insecurity, Sandy was able to focus her talents and energy towards building a successful catering company with her daughter; a small-business that now supports them well.

Need Rises in Larimer County

July 2016 was a record-breaking month for Food Bank for Larimer County. From April to June we supported 50,000 household visits, breaking a previous record set in 2012 at the end of the great recession. The number of times guests visit Food Share has also increased from 2.95 visits a month in 2010, to 3.81 visits a month in April-June 2016.

The increased need also has required increased efforts to source and redistribute more food. In 2012, we distributed around 1.5 million pounds of food in April-June. In 2016, we distributed 2.04 million pounds in the last quarter. The continued growth in service means we are reaching warehouse storage capacity and putting a greater-than-ever strain on existing resources.

The future is always uncertain, but based on State Demographers projections, we expect to see continued growth in the need for our services. By 2035, the population of Larimer County is projected to reach 450,000, while the number of individuals eligible for Food Bank programs could climb to nearly 120,000. To prepare, we are working on several new initiatives that will be announced in the coming months, including a new partnership with Volunteers of America to increase meal service and potentially fresh food access for seniors. Please keep in touch on social media and through this newsletter for the latest information.

Our vision is a hunger-free Larimer County and we hope that as the population increases we can keep up with the demand and help all people in need through innovative solutions. We hope you will join us as we continue our work to ensure no one in our community goes hungry.

Kids Cafe Fights Summer Hunger

This summer, Food Bank for Larimer County’s Kids Cafe is providing free summer meals in Fort Collins, Loveland, Wellington and Estes Park. The Food Bank plans to serve 56,000 meals during June, July and August. Every day in June the Community Kitchen produced:

  • 400 snacks for three locations,
  • 970 lunches for twelve locations,
  • and 150 breakfasts for two locations.

Summer meals give children a chance to access good meals and to try new things that are healthy and tasty.

“Chili Hoagies are a big hit” said Justin Kruger, Food Bank Executive Chef and Community Kitchen Manager, “the spicy chicken taco was very popular on Wednesday.  Our varieties of baked taquitos are all well liked.  The cinnamon sugar tortilla roll-up has been a big breakfast hit.” Justin runs kitchen operations along with Mike DeBonte.

Liz Donovan, Food Bank Programs Manager and registered dietitian, oversees the planning and production of foods every week. All meals and snacks meet or exceed USDA guidelines. Meals are prepared fresh in the Kids Cafe kitchen by volunteers under the supervision of Food Bank staff.

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